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Print starts fading out; most major Indian publications losing readers

Now, here’s the bad news — the Indian print media too has begun seeing a decline in readership as has been happening in many Western countries. Most of the top-rung newspapers and magazines have lost out on readers, according to the Indian Readership Survey (IRS) 2007 Round 1.

'Dainik Jagran' continues to be number one among all publications in the country despite a 6 per cent drop in readership. From 18,194,000 in Indian Readership Survey 2006 Round 2, the newspaper’s readership now stands at 17,114,000. 'Dainik Bhaskar' too has dropped by over 7 per cent and now has a readership of 12,514,000. 'Hindustan', the third most read newspaper, has dropped by almost 7 per cent and has 9,052,000 readers.

Dainik Jagran continues to be number one among all publications in the country despite a 6 per cent drop in readership. From 18,194,000 in IRS 2006 Round 2, the newspaper’s readership now stands at 17,114,000. Dainik Bhaskar too has dropped by over 7 per cent and now has a readership of 12,514,000. Hindustan, the third most read newspaper, has dropped by almost 7 per cent and has 9,052,000 readers. Malayala Manorama’s readership has dropped from 9,140,000 to 8,837,000, but has still managed to rise up a notch to the fourth spot.

Fifth-ranked is Daily Thanthi which has suffered a loss of over 10 per cent – its readership has dropped from 9,315,000 to 8,351,000. The next, Amar Ujala, has seen a drop of 12 per cent (it was fourth placed last time out) and now has a readership of 8,255,000. Eenadu lost 5 per cent of its readers and now has 7,233,000. Mathrubhumi saw a 6 per cent drop and has a 6,961,000 readership base. Rajasthan Patrika, the only newspaper to in fact clock a positive growth, is the only new entrant in the Top 10 bracket at the ninth spot. Its readership has grown from 6,713,000 to 6,946,000. Lokmat, the tenth, has lost about 10 per cent of its readers and now has 6,874,000.

The survey was conducted by the Media Research User’s Council (MRUC) between January and December 2006.

'Daily News & Analysis' is the only one in this segment which has seen an increase in readership – an impressive 22 per cent – and now has a readership of 539,000. The 'Tribune' too has grown – by 4 per cent – and has a readership of 539,000 as well and shares the eighth position. 'Mid Day' has dropped by 15 per cent and is now tenth-placed with a readership of 509,000.

The only English daily in the Top 10 bracket all these years, the Times of India, has been pushed out after it saw a 2 per cent drop in readership. It still remains the most-read English daily with a readership of 6,781,000. Hindustan Times is next with 3,331,000, but has seen a 5 per cent drop in readership. The Hindu has suffered a 14 per cent drop and now has a readership of 2,209,000. Fourth-placed Deccan Chronicle has increased its readership marginally from 1,243,000 to 1,311,000. The Telegraph is fifth but has lost 8 per cent of its readership and now has 919,000 readers.

The Economic Times has seen its readership dip by 4 per cent and now has a readership of 774,000. Mumbai Mirror has seen a marginal drop and has 735,000 readers. Daily News & Analysis is the only one in this segment which has seen an increase in readership – an impressive 22 per cent – and now has a readership of 539,000. The Tribune too has grown – by 4 per cent – and has a readership of 539,000 as well and shares the eighth position. Mid Day has dropped by 15 per cent and is now tenth-placed with a readership of 509,000.

The Deccan Herald is the eleventh, having been knocked out of the Top 10 English newspapers bracket, with a readership of 498,000, an 8 per cent decline in readership. The other newspaper to exit the bracket was the New Indian Express which now has a readership of 473,000, down from 523,000.

Magazines have seen a similar drop in readership.

The Indian print media too, contrary to many observations and predictions, has started seeing a decline in readership as has been happening in many Western countries. Most of the top-rung newspapers and magazines have lost out on readers, according to the Indian Readership Survey (IRS) 2007 Round 1.

Saras Salil (Hindi) has seen a significant 24 per cent drop in readership but still remains the number one magazine with a readership of 4,760,000 – down from 6,302,000. Vanitha (Malayalam) is second, but has seen a drop in readership too – from 3,312,000 to 3,067,000. India Today (English)’s readership has declined by 11 per cent from 3,137,000 to 2,786,000. Grihsobha (Hindi) is fourth – it has seen a 10 per cent drop in readership and now has a base of 2,486,000. Malayala Manorama’s readership has fallen from 2,501,000 to 2,294,000, but keeps it at fifth.

Kumudam has seen a sharp 16 per cent decline and now has a readership of 2,130,000. Balarama has fallen from 2,263,000 to 2,124,000. India Today (Hindi) has dwindled by 20 per cent, and now has a readership of 1,943,000. Ananda Vikatan saw an 18 per cent drop in readership and now has 1,898,000. Readers Digest has lost 8 per cent readers and now has a readership of 1,869,000.

India Today (English), Malayala Manorama, Kumudam, Balarama, India Today (Hindi), Ananda Vikatan are weeklies; Saras Salil (Hindi), Vanitha (Malayalam) are fortnighlies; the rest are monthlies.

Date posted: March 23, 2007 Last modified: May 23, 2018 Total views: 10412